Net Job Losses In Development, Designer Positions?

The headline would seem indicative: Apple’s Safari, Mozilla’s Firefox lose market share:

Apple Inc.’s ploy to gain browser market share by pushing Safari to users with an update tool normally used for security fixes failed to boost its overall share, a Web metrics company said yesterday.

Instead, Safari’s share fell last month to 5.5%, down from March’s 5.8%, while Microsoft’s Internet Explorer increased its dominance by growing to 76% from March’s 74.8%. It was the first time Internet Explorer (IE) gained share since October 2007.

And:

Firefox’s share also fell in April by nearly a percentage point from the month prior. The open-source browser, which had accounted for 17.8% of the usage market in March, dropped to 17% last month. It was the largest one-month drop in the browser’s market share since May 2007, and put an end to a run of five consecutive months of gains.

Developers and designers will remain oblivious to the implications, however, and will continue to test their work only in their preferred browsers, ensuring that Web sites and applications remain quirky, to say the least, in the dominant Web browser.

No Responses to “Net Job Losses In Development, Designer Positions?”

  1. gimlet Says:

    I’m just awaiting the chaos that will be Internet Explorer 8…

  2. The Director Says:

    The best part is the required simultaneous support for 6/7 and 8 since many corporate environments will drag their feet in upgrading.

  3. strazzerj Says:

    “Developers and designers will remain oblivious to the implications, however, and will continue to test their work only in their preferred browsers”

    I’m not sure I understand what you mean by “the implications” here?
    IE remains dominant, Firefox and Safari share has dropped.

    Should people test differently, due to these two snippets?

  4. The Director Says:

    I’ve had a lot of experience with Web designers who only review their sites in Safari and Web developers who only review their work in Firefox before sending it to QA. As such, they’re often caught by surprise, daily or weekly, to discover that to the majority of the Web’s actual users would not see what they do or would encounter problems with sites that are effectively developed for a Web browser with limited market share.

    This particular story is a good bludgeon to use on them, though, to remind them to review their work in more than one browser.


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