The Race Condition Is Not To The Swift; These Guys Are Swift

Two sellers on Amazon dance to the beats of their own algorithm:

A few weeks ago a postdoc in my lab logged on to Amazon to buy the lab an extra copy of Peter Lawrence’s The Making of a Fly – a classic work in developmental biology that we – and most other Drosophila developmental biologists – consult regularly. The book, published in 1992, is out of print. But Amazon listed 17 copies for sale: 15 used from $35.54, and 2 new from $1,730,045.91 (+$3.99 shipping).

I sent a screen capture to the author – who was appropriate amused and intrigued. But I doubt even he would argue the book is worth THAT much.

At first I thought it was a joke – a graduate student with too much time on their hands. But there were TWO new copies for sale, each be offered for well over a million dollars. And the two sellers seemed not only legit, but fairly big time (over 8,000 and 125,000 ratings in the last year respectively). The prices looked random – suggesting they were set by a computer. But how did they get so out of whack?

When you’re building something that reacts to events in the cloud, you’re going to get some strange events. You’ll need to consider some alternative workflows, such as unreliable input and buggy software dependencies.

Because this example shows another “Never” happening.

(Link seen on Twitter.)

Comments are closed.